1. shakib:

Le maillot jaune

    shakib:

    Le maillot jaune

    Reblogged from: bicycleart
  2. Reblogged from: generic-art
  3. Good article in the NYT, “Imax? Try a Cosmos Between Covers: From the Printed Comic to ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’.” Dana Jennings suggests, “… comic books are usually better than the movies. Much better.”

The exquisite thing about the page is that comic books are both a reading experience and a lesson in art appreciation. The reader can pause, ponder what she’s just read; the art lover can stop, gaze in wonder at a stunning full-page spread. There’s more Bergman-like introspection in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Silver Surfer roaming the cosmos than in any comics movie.
Most comic book films just don’t leave room for the viewer. They’re a blitz: Each frame is crammed pandemonium — exploding androids, cartwheeling bodies, cascading skyscrapers — all pumped up by quasi-operatic music, Wagner draped in superhero drag. The dazed viewer is left spluttering: “Wow! What was that?!”

Reading an original story is a lot more open than watching an interpretation of said story. The reader is allowed to see it as only he can imagine it and the story doesn’t have to be compromised because of a budget. As Dana mentions, there’s also the art. Jack Kirby, Frank Miller… reminds me of my old friend Jamie. I used to watch him trace comic books in an effort to learn how these artists were able to depict a particular scene, mood, and message. We were both kids fascinated with stories of the unimaginable, the physiques and strangeness of beings both good and evil, and the interpretations we’d share over a bologna, salami, and Miracle Whip on Wonder Bread sandwich when we’d finish reading the same issue. Half-chewed fragments would usually be spat at each other in an effort to talk first when a particular story would pit two characters or teams against each other for the first time (or when they combined efforts). A lot of young’ns won’t realize how much history and storyline are behind today’s visual and audio blowouts. Film budgets and attention-spans for films won’t allow for it. The X-Men films, for example, fails the Jean story. It’s complex and one that is really only suited for reading. Let’s be honest, film franchises can only succeed, on average, with a series of about 3-6 films (I propose by the third movie, people are pretty much done for good). Many comic series number in the hundreds…

    Good article in the NYT, “Imax? Try a Cosmos Between Covers: From the Printed Comic to ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’.” Dana Jennings suggests, “… comic books are usually better than the movies. Much better.

    The exquisite thing about the page is that comic books are both a reading experience and a lesson in art appreciation. The reader can pause, ponder what she’s just read; the art lover can stop, gaze in wonder at a stunning full-page spread. There’s more Bergman-like introspection in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Silver Surfer roaming the cosmos than in any comics movie.

    Most comic book films just don’t leave room for the viewer. They’re a blitz: Each frame is crammed pandemonium — exploding androids, cartwheeling bodies, cascading skyscrapers — all pumped up by quasi-operatic music, Wagner draped in superhero drag. The dazed viewer is left spluttering: “Wow! What was that?!”

    Reading an original story is a lot more open than watching an interpretation of said story. The reader is allowed to see it as only he can imagine it and the story doesn’t have to be compromised because of a budget. As Dana mentions, there’s also the art. Jack Kirby, Frank Miller… reminds me of my old friend Jamie. I used to watch him trace comic books in an effort to learn how these artists were able to depict a particular scene, mood, and message. We were both kids fascinated with stories of the unimaginable, the physiques and strangeness of beings both good and evil, and the interpretations we’d share over a bologna, salami, and Miracle Whip on Wonder Bread sandwich when we’d finish reading the same issue. Half-chewed fragments would usually be spat at each other in an effort to talk first when a particular story would pit two characters or teams against each other for the first time (or when they combined efforts). A lot of young’ns won’t realize how much history and storyline are behind today’s visual and audio blowouts. Film budgets and attention-spans for films won’t allow for it. The X-Men films, for example, fails the Jean story. It’s complex and one that is really only suited for reading. Let’s be honest, film franchises can only succeed, on average, with a series of about 3-6 films (I propose by the third movie, people are pretty much done for good). Many comic series number in the hundreds…

  4. Is it really wrong to drink iced coffee out of a cocktail shaker?

  5. Was about to straddle when I saw this little fella. Yeah, I like the bishopbikes​ too.

  6. In my house, the proportions are the other way around and it kills me to have to unjam the washer because I’ve Brady-Bunch’d 4 loads into 1.

    In my house, the proportions are the other way around and it kills me to have to unjam the washer because I’ve Brady-Bunch’d 4 loads into 1.

    Reblogged from: generic-art
  7. The Creative Art of Selling a Book by Its Cover

    Peter Mendelsund, an associate art director at Alfred A. Knopf, had a tough time designing his own book cover (follow link above).

    I would have thought an interesting solution would be to give the job of designing his book cover to someone else.

  8. weirdvintage:

Julia Child and television crew on the set of her cooking show, The French Chef, Photo by Paul Child, 1963 (via Vintage Photo LJ)

I’m the one with the plate.
Every. Day.

    weirdvintage:

    Julia Child and television crew on the set of her cooking show, The French Chef, Photo by Paul Child, 1963 (via Vintage Photo LJ)

    I’m the one with the plate.

    Every. Day.

    Reblogged from: weirdvintage
  9. Just found out one of my son’s soccer tournaments is near a White Castle.

    WHITE CASTLE.

    Might have to go for an extra long “pee” during halftime.

  10. I keep messing with this jasmine plant. It grows straight into the window. I don’t blame it. But I don’t want it to feel unaccomplished. So I wind its stems around so it grows in a different direction.

  11. patchwork-girlfriend:

    Marguerite Duras on telling absolutely no one anything about what you’re writing, ever, until it’s done.

    mcnallyjackson:

    Words that equally support genius and mania: 

    "I couldn’t talk about it, because the slightest intrusion into the book, the slightest ‘objective’ opinion would have erased everything, of that book. […] The illusion one has—entirely correct—of being the only one to have written what one has written, no matter if it’s worthless or marvelous. And when I read my reviews, most of the time I responded to the fact that people said it was like nothing else. In other words, that it reconnected with the initial solitude of the author.”

    —Marguerite Duras, Writing.

    Reblogged from: patchwork-girlfriend
  12. charlieambler:

luc tuymans2006

Easter.

    charlieambler:

    luc tuymans
    2006

    Easter.

    Reblogged from: charlieambler
  13. Man make fire.Fire good.

    Man make fire.
    Fire good.

  14. Reblogged from: generic-art
  15. pixography:

Yue Minjun ~ “Eyesight”, 2013

    pixography:

    Yue Minjun ~ “Eyesight”, 2013

    Reblogged from: generic-art
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